John’s Believe It Or Not… April 19th

* 1907 – Six Nations marathon runner Tom Longboat wins the 11th Boston marathon. * 1897 First Boston Marathon held * 1775 The American Revolution begins * 1989 Central Park jogger attack shocks New York City * 1975 The Captain and Tennille bring wedded bliss to the pop charts with their first hit record

It’s Thursday! Did You Know…

* 1907 – Six Nations marathon runner Tom Longboat wins the 11th Boston marathon.

A legendary athlete, he was adored and celebrated as the finest runner of his time. But journalists of the day could never reconcile such brilliance with his First Nations origin.

The story is told that somewhere in France during the Great War, a British general, being led to the front by a dispatch runner, grew irritated with the pace set by the man and ordered him to slow down. “For God’s sakes,” he complained. “Who do you think I am? Tom Longboat?” The dispatch runner, a tall man in his late twenties, slowed and answered, “No sir. That’s me.” Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 19th”

Good People Doing Good Things — Chad Houser

In her weekly series, “Good People Doing Good Things”, Jill Dennison gifts us with a story about Chad Houser, a chef and restauranteur in Dallas, Texas, who runs a program to help young juveniles who were incarcerated to learn skills they can use to support themselves and contribute to society. Please share.

Filosofa's Word

Welcome to Wednesday morning and our weekly Good People feature.  For those who have only recently begun following Filosofa’s Word, every Wednesday morning I shine a light on people who are giving back, giving of themselves to help others and make the world just a little better place for us all.  We are inundated with so much negativity these days, so many examples of greed and bigotry, that I think it serves us well to step back every now and then, to remind ourselves that there are a lot of good people in this world.  I refer to these as the ‘silent majority’, for they are too busy out there doing good to have time to be loudly tooting their own horn.  So today, I would like to introduce you to Chad Houser of Dallas, Texas …

In 2007, Chad Houser bought into a popular bistro in Dallas, and his…

View original post 1,148 more words

John’s Believe It Or Not… April 18th

* 1645 – Mme. La Tour surrenders Fort La Tour to Charles d’Aulnay after three-day siege. * 1906 The Great San Francisco Earthquake * 1974 The Red Brigade terrorizes Italy * 1958 Federal court decides to release Ezra Pound * 2012 Dick Clark – host of “American Bandstand” and “New Year’s Rockin’ Eve” – dies

It’s Hump Day Wednesday! Did You Know…

* 1645 – Mme. La Tour surrenders Fort La Tour to Charles d’Aulnay after three-day siege.

In 1635, Governor of Acadia Charles de Menou d’Aulnay de Charnisay moved settlers from present-day LaHave, Nova Scotia to Port-Royal, and the Acadian people began to establish their roots. Under Aulnay, the Acadians built the first dikes in North America and cultivated the reclaimed salt marshes. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 18th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… April 17th

* April 17 1840 – Fenian rebel Benjamin Lett sets off a Good Friday blast – blowing the top off Brock’s Monument * 1961 The Bay of Pigs invasion begins * 1936 A single horsehair uncovers a murderer * 1790 Benjamin Franklin dies * 2002 General Hospital airs 10,000th episode

It’s Tuesday! Did You Know…

* April 17, 1840 – Fenian rebel Benjamin Lett sets off a Good Friday blast – blowing the top off Brock’s Monument

Isaac Brock was killed on 13 October 1812 in the Battle of Queenston Heights. He was leading a charge to retake a gun emplacement on Queenston Heights’ northern slope that had been captured by the invading American forces when he was shot in the wrist and chest. Before the battle at Queenston Heights, Brock had, with the help of Indigenous warriors, captured Fort Michilimackinac in July 1812 as well as Detroit that August. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 17th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… April 16th

* 1818 – Rush & Bagot agree to extend US Boundary from Lake of the Woods to Great Divide. * 1746 Jacobite Rising 1745: Battle of Culloden * 1943 Hallucinogenic effects of LSD discovered * 2007 Virginia Tech shooting leaves 32 dead * 1977 David Soul – of Starsky & Hutch – has the #1 song on the U.S. pop charts

It’s Monday! Did You Know…

* 1818 – Rush & Bagot agree to extend US Boundary from Lake of the Woods to Great Divide.

The Canada–United States border, officially known as the International Boundary, is the longest international border in the world between two countries. It is shared between Canada and the United States, the second- and fourth-largest countries by area, respectively. The terrestrial boundary (including portions of maritime boundaries in the Great Lakes, and on the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic coasts) is 8,891 kilometers (5,525 mi) long, of which 2,475 kilometers (1,538 mi) is Canada’s border with Alaska. Eight Canadian provinces and territories (Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick), and thirteen U.S. states (Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine) are located along the border. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 16th”

On Voters Not Voting – Part III: Solutions

Jill Dennison has gifted us with the third and final part of her series “On Voters Not Voting.” She offers practical and well-considered solutions to increase voter turnout across the United States. Please share.

Filosofa's Word

In Part I of this project, we looked at the reasons people give for not voting, and in Part II, we looked at the demographics … who isn’t voting, and why.  When we put those two together, we see why some people aren’t voting, for the system is designed to make it difficult for them.  In this, the final part of the project on voters not voting, we will look at some ways to effect change.  There are actually two distinct groups of non-voters:  those who are at least partly disenfranchised, for whom the system has made voting a difficult task, and those who are either too lazy or apathetic to stir themselves to vote.  The solutions are different for each of these groups, so we need to look at them separately.  But first, a disclaimer.  There is no panacea, no simple, single solution that will all of a…

View original post 1,480 more words

On Voters Not Voting – Part II: The Demographics

We are gifted once more with Part II of Jill Dennison’s 3-part series on voting issues in U.S. elections, where she investigates the hurdles that some people must navigate in order to vote. An excellent post! Please share.

Filosofa's Word

Only 67% or all eligible voters are even registered to vote.  That is only two out of every three adults.  In Part I of this project, I looked at the reasons people gave for not voting, some of which were ludicrous, such as “forgot”, “weather”, and “too busy”.  But there are some legitimate reasons that people do not vote.  To understand these, I think it is important to look at some of the demographics of the non-voters.

Race

Among white voters, 73.5% of eligible voters did actually vote in 2016.  But minorities were much less likely to vote, with only 69.7% of African-Americans, 59.4% of Latinos, and the lowest group being Asians at 55.3%.

Age

Not surprisingly, the percentage of eligible voters who vote increases with age:

Age 18 to 24       58.5%

Age 25 to 34       66.4%

Age 35 to 44       69.9%

Age 45 to 54       73.5%

Age 55 to…

View original post 912 more words

On Voters Not Voting – Part I: The Problem

Jill Dennison gifts us with a well-researched analysis of the voting statistics from the 2016 US election and explores reasons given why so many didn’t vote that day. Please share.

Filosofa's Word

In the 2016 elections, U.S. citizens stood to lose a lot.  As we now know, we stood to lose our voices.  And yet, with so much riding on a single day, with our very futures and those of our children on the line, a huge number of Americans could not be bothered to take an hour out of their day to go vote.  In fact, according to a Pew Research Center analysis,  U.S. voter turnout was very low compared to other nations’ recent elections.  In Belgium, 87.2% of eligible voters actually voted, and in Mexico, 66%.  The U.S.?  55.7%.  Just over half of all those who could have voted, actually did.  Where were the rest of the people who might have been able to save us from the chaos our nation has become?  Let us take a look at some of the excuses reasons that are offered1:

View original post 884 more words

John’s Believe It Or Not… April 13th

* 2000 – Nisga’a Treaty gets Royal Assent. * 1919 The Amritsar Massacre * 1964 Sidney Poitier wins Best Actor Oscar for Lilies of the Field * 1990 Soviets admit to Katyn Massacre * 1360 Hail kills English troops

It’s Friday! TGIF! Did You Know…

* 2000 – Nisga’a Treaty gets Royal Assent.

The Nisga’a Treaty is a negotiated agreement between the Nisga’a Nation, the Government of British Columbia (B.C.) and the Government of Canada. It came into effect on May 11, 2000.

The Nisga’a Treaty is the first modern-day treaty in B.C. and is the fourteenth modern treaty in Canada to be negotiated since 1976. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 13th”

John’s Believe It Or Not… April 12th

* 1876 – Parliament passes the Indian Act to consolidate laws respecting First Nations. * 1980 – Terry Fox starts ‘Marathon of Hope’ for Cancer Society. * 1861 The American Civil War begins * 1961 First man in space * 1981 First launching of the space shuttle

It’s Thursday! Did You Know…

* 1876 – Parliament passes the Indian Act to consolidate laws respecting First Nations.

The Indian Act is the principal statute through which the federal government administers Indian status, local First Nations governments and the management of reserve land and communal monies. It was first introduced in 1876 as a consolidation of previous colonial ordinances that aimed to eradicate First Nations culture in favor of assimilation into Euro-Canadian society. The Act has been amended several times, most significantly in 1951 and 1985, with changes mainly focusing on the removal of particularly discriminatory sections. Continue reading “John’s Believe It Or Not… April 12th”

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started